Lodi, New Jersey





Lodi (/ˈloʊ.daɪ/ LOW-dy) is a borough in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 24,136, reflecting an increase of 165 (+0.7%) from the 23,971 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 1,616 (+7.2%) from the 22,355 counted in the 1990 Census.

Lodi owes its name to the Italian city of Lodi, Lombardy. It was incorporated as a borough on December 22, 1894, from portions of the now-defunct municipalities of Lodi Township and Saddle River Township, at the height of Bergen County's "Boroughitis" phenomenon then sweeping through Bergen County, based on the results of a referendum held on the previous day.

Geography



According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough has a total area of 2.285 square miles (5.918 km2), of which, 2.265 square miles (5.865 km2) of it was land and 0.020 square miles (0.053 km2) of it (0.89%)was water.

The borough borders Garfield, Hackensack, Hasbrouck Heights, Maywood, Rochelle Park, Saddle Brook, South Hackensack and Wood-Ridge.

Demographics



2010 Census

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 24,136 people, 9,471 households, and 6,109 families residing in the borough. The population density was 10,657.6 per square mile (4,114.9/km2). There were 10,127 housing units at an average density of 4,471.7 per square mile (1,726.5/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 68.19% (16,459) White, 7.52% (1,816) Black or African American, 0.42% (101) Native American, 8.57% (2,069) Asian, 0.06% (15) Pacific Islander, 11.49% (2,774) from other races, and 3.74% (902) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 30.49% (7,360) of the population.

There were 9,471 households, of which 29.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.4% were married couples living together, 16.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.5% were non-families. 30.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.54 and the average family size was 3.18.

In the borough, 21.3% of the population were under the age of 18, 8.6% from 18 to 24, 30.7% from 25 to 44, 26.3% from 45 to 64, and 13.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37.7 years. For every 100 females there were 90.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.7 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $55,541 (with a margin of error of +/- $3,430) and the median family income was $65,494 (+/- $4,924). Males had a median income of $49,002 (+/- $4,353) versus $37,108 (+/- $5,243) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $25,910 (+/- $1,786). About 10.1% of families and 12.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.4% of those under age 18 and 15.5% of those age 65 or over.

Same-sex couples headed 64 households in 2010, an increase from the 44 countd a decade earlier.

2000 Census

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 23,971 people, 9,528 households, and 6,097 families residing in the borough. The population density was 10,590.6 people per square mile (4,095.2/km2). There were 9,908 housing units at an average density of 4,377.4 per square mile (1,692.7/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 78.16% White, 3.55% African American, 0.17% Native American, 8.86% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 6.25% from other races, and 2.97% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 17.98% of the population.

There were 9,528 households out of which 28.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.6% were married couples living together, 13.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.0% were non-families. 30.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 3.16.

In the borough the population was spread out with 21.3% under the age of 18, 8.2% from 18 to 24, 34.5% from 25 to 44, 21.2% from 45 to 64, and 14.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 90.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.0 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $43,421, and the median income for a family was $51,959. Males had a median income of $38,781 versus $31,253 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $21,667. About 5.3% of families and 8.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.9% of those under age 18 and 9.8% of those age 65 or over.

Government



Local government

Lodi operates under the 1923 Municipal Manager Law form of New Jersey municipal government. The voters elect five members to a council who are elected at-large in non-partisan elections held as part of the May municipal election to serve four-year terms of office on a concurrent basis. A mayor and deputy mayor are selected by the council from among its members. The council is an exclusively legislative body with responsibility for day-to-day operation of the borough assigned to a manager who acts as the municipal chief executive and executes laws and policies, prepares the budget for council consideration and attends and participates at meetings with a voice, but no vote. The manager recommends improvements and implements those approved, as well as oversees contracts and franchises and reports violations. It is the responsibility of the manager to appoint and remove department heads and make all additional appointments not made by the council.

As of 2015, members of the Lodi Township Council are Mayor Marc N. Schrieks, Deputy Mayor Patricia Ann Licata, Laura E. Cima, Paula Fiduccia and Bruce Masopust, all of whom were elected in 2011 and serve terms that expire on June 30, 2015.

Schrieks was elected by the council as mayor on July 1, 2008 and served until June 30, 2009, making him the youngest person to ever serve as its Mayor. Karen Viscana was the first woman to serve as mayor in the history of Lodi when she was sworn in to office in 2008.

Federal, state and county representation

Lodi is located in the 5th Congressional District and is part of New Jersey's 38th state legislative district. Prior to the 2010 Census, Lodi had been part of the 9th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.

New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District is represented by Scott Garrett (R, Wantage Township). New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021) and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).

The 38th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Robert M. Gordon (D, Fair Lawn) and in the General Assembly by Tim Eustace (D, Maywood) and Joseph Lagana (D, Paramus). The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township). The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).

Bergen County is governed by a directly elected County Executive, with legislative functions performed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders. As of 2015, the County Executive is James J. Tedesco III (D, Paramus; term ends December 31, 2018). The seven freeholders are elected at-large in partisan elections on a staggered basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year, with a Chairman, Vice Chairman and Chairman Pro Tempore selected from among its members at a reorganization meeting held each January. Bergen County's Freeholders are Freeholder Chairwoman Joan Voss (D, 2017; Fort Lee), Vice Chairman Steve Tanelli (D, 2015; North Arlington) Chairman Pro Tempore John A. Felice (R, 2016; River Edge), David L. Ganz (D, 2017; Fair Lawn), Maura R. DeNicola (R, 2016; Franklin Lakes) Thomas J. Sullivan Jr., (D, Montvale, 2015; serving the unexpired term of office that had been occupied by James Tedesco before he was sworn in as County Executive) and Tracy Silna Zur (D, 2015; Franklin Lakes), with one vacant seat expiring in 2015 that had been occupied by James Tedesco before he was sworn in as County Executive. Countywide constitutional officials are County Clerk John S. Hogan (D, Northvale), Sheriff Michael Saudino (R) and Surrogate Michael R. Dressler (D, Cresskill).

Politics

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 11,177 registered voters in Lodi, of which 4,043 (36.2% vs. 31.7% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 1,324 (11.8% vs. 21.1%) were registered as Republicans and 5,805 (51.9% vs. 47.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 5 voters registered to other parties. Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 46.3% (vs. 57.1% in Bergen County) were registered to vote, including 58.9% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 73.7% countywide).

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 5,420 votes (67.2% vs. 54.8% countywide), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 2,508 votes (31.1% vs. 43.5%) and other candidates with 56 votes (0.7% vs. 0.9%), among the 8,070 ballots cast by the borough's 12,305 registered voters, for a turnout of 65.6% (vs. 70.4% in Bergen County). In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 5,174 votes (59.7% vs. 53.9% countywide), ahead of Republican John McCain with 3,358 votes (38.7% vs. 44.5%) and other candidates with 70 votes (0.8% vs. 0.8%), among the 8,667 ballots cast by the borough's 11,983 registered voters, for a turnout of 72.3% (vs. 76.8% in Bergen County). In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 4,696 votes (57.9% vs. 51.7% countywide), ahead of Republican George W. Bush with 3,344 votes (41.2% vs. 47.2%) and other candidates with 52 votes (0.6% vs. 0.7%), among the 8,115 ballots cast by the borough's 11,598 registered voters, for a turnout of 70.0% (vs. 76.9% in the whole county).

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 52.0% of the vote (2,135 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 46.9% (1,924 votes), and other candidates with 1.1% (46 votes), among the 4,256 ballots cast by the borough's 11,672 registered voters (151 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 36.5%. In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 2,651 ballots cast (56.2% vs. 48.0% countywide), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 1,834 votes (38.9% vs. 45.8%), Independent Chris Daggett with 173 votes (3.7% vs. 4.7%) and other candidates with 33 votes (0.7% vs. 0.5%), among the 4,720 ballots cast by the borough's 11,546 registered voters, yielding a 40.9% turnout (vs. 50.0% in the county).

Education



The Lodi Public Schools serve students in pre-Kindergarten through twelfth grade. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's seven schools had an enrollment of 3,332 students and 226.7 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a studentâ€"teacher ratio of 14.70:1. Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics) are five elementary schools â€" Columbus Elementary School (grades K-5; 259 students), Hilltop Elementary School (PreK-5; 419), Roosevelt Elementary School (PreK-5; 161), Washington Elementary School (PreK-5; 439) and Wilson Elementary School (PreK-5; 365) â€" Thomas Jefferson Middle School (757) for grades 6-8 and Lodi High School (932) for grades 9-12.

Public school students from the borough, and all of Bergen County, are eligible to attend the secondary education programs offered by the Bergen County Technical Schools, which include the Bergen County Academies in Hackensack, and the Bergen Tech campus in Teterboro or Paramus. The district offers programs on a shared-time or full-time basis, with admission based on a selective application process and tuition covered by the student's home school district.

Transportation



Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 40.00 miles (64.37 km) of roadways, of which 32.24 miles (51.89 km) were maintained by the municipality, 4.56 miles (7.34 km) by Bergen County and 3.20 miles (5.15 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Route 17, U.S. Route 46 and Interstate 80 pass through Lodi.

Public transportation

New Jersey Transit bus routes 144, 161 and 164 offer service between the borough and the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan, while 709, 712 and 780 provide local service.

In media and culture



Lodi is home to the transmitter and towers for New York radio station WABC (AM).

The Satin Dolls go-go bar in Lodi was used as the filming location for the fictional Bada Bing bar in the HBO drama television series The Sopranos (1999-2007). Lodi High School and various stores in the borough were also used as filming locations.

Notable people



People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Lodi include:

  • Frederick Behne (1873-1918), fireman first class serving in the United States Navy who received the Medal of Honor for bravery.
  • Joan Berger (born 1933), infielder and outfielder who played in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League.
  • Dr. Chud (born 1964), former drummer for horror punk band The Misfits.
  • Franché Coma (born 1957), former guitarist for The Misfits.
  • Glenn Danzig (born 1955), former singer and songwriter for The Misfits, now singer and songwriter in the band Danzig.
  • Howie Janotta (1924-2010), basketball player who played for the Baltimore Bullets.
  • Dean Obeidallah (born 1969), comedian.
  • Jerry Only (born 1959), bass player and vocalist for The Misfits.
  • Louis Ricco (born 1929), caporegime of the Gambino crime family.
  • Anthony Scillia (born 1982), radio and TV personality.
  • Rich Skrosky (born 1964), football player and coach.
  • Nathan Sonenshein (1915-2001), rear admiral in the United States Navy.
  • Eerie Von (born 1964), former bass guitar player for Samhain and Danzig.
  • Spann Watson (1916-2014), Tuskegee Airman.
  • Doyle Wolfgang von Frankenstein (born 1964), former guitarist for The Misfits.
  • Steve Zing (born 1964), drummer.

References



Sources



  • Municipal Incorporations of the State of New Jersey (according to Counties) prepared by the Division of Local Government, Department of the Treasury (New Jersey); December 1, 1958.
  • Clayton, W. Woodford; and Nelson, William. History of Bergen and Passaic Counties, New Jersey, with Biographical Sketches of Many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men. Philadelphia: Everts and Peck, 1882.
  • Harvey, Cornelius Burnham (ed.), Genealogical History of Hudson and Bergen Counties, New Jersey. New York: New Jersey Genealogical Publishing Co., 1900.
  • Van Valen, James M. History of Bergen County, New Jersey. New York: New Jersey Publishing and Engraving Co., 1900.
  • Westervelt, Frances A. (Frances Augusta), 1858-1942, History of Bergen County, New Jersey, 1630-1923, Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1923.

External links



  • Lodi official website
  • Lodi Public Schools
  • Lodi Library website
  • Lodi Public Schools's 2012â€"13 School Report Card from the New Jersey Department of Education
  • School Data for the Lodi Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics
  • FUSRAP Maywood Superfund Site - within the boundaries of Maywood, but affects neighboring towns also


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