Hawthorne, New Jersey





Hawthorne (pronounced HAW-thorn) is a borough in Passaic County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 18,791 reflecting an increase of 573 (+3.1%) from the 18,218 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 1,134 (+6.6%) from the 17,084 counted in the 1990 Census.

Hawthorne was originally part of the now-defunct Manchester Township, which was later subdivided to create Hawthorne, Haledon, North Haledon, Prospect Park, Totowa and most of the First Ward of Paterson. The Borough of Hawthorne was incorporated from portions of Manchester Township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 24, 1898.

Geography


Hawthorne, New Jersey

Hawthorne is located at 40°57′25″N 74°09′31″W (40.956957,-74.158561). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 3.364 square miles (8.715 km2), of which, 3.334 square miles (8.636 km2) of it was land and 0.030 square miles (0.079 km2) of it (0.90%) was water.

Demographics



2010 Census

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 18,791 people, 7,454 households, and 4,949 families residing in the borough. The population density was 5,635.3 per square mile (2,175.8/km2). There were 7,756 housing units at an average density of 2,326.0 per square mile (898.1/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 88.62% (16,652) White, 2.27% (426) Black or African American, 0.21% (40) Native American, 2.82% (530) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 4.28% (804) from other races, and 1.80% (339) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 15.42% (2,897) of the population.

There were 7,454 households, of which 29.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.7% were married couples living together, 11.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.6% were non-families. 27.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.12.

In the borough, 21.4% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.3% from 18 to 24, 28.6% from 25 to 44, 28.3% from 45 to 64, and 14.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.2 years. For every 100 females there were 92.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.4 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $72,985 (with a margin of error of +/- $6,585) and the median family income was $83,136 (+/- $7,364). Males had a median income of $64,906 (+/- $7,150) versus $44,641 (+/- $2,852) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $33,872 (+/- $1,921). About 4.9% of families and 7.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.4% of those under age 18 and 7.2% of those age 65 or over.

Same-sex couples headed 48 households in 2010, a 50% increase from the 32 counted in 2000.

2000 Census

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 18,218 people, 7,260 households, and 4,929 families residing in the borough. The population density was 5,364.9 people per square mile (2,068.8/km2). There were 7,419 housing units at an average density of 2,184.8 per square mile (842.5/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 93.75% White, 0.75% African American, 0.14% Native American, 1.89% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 1.58% from other races, and 1.88% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.43% of the population.

There were 7,260 households out of which 28.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.1% were married couples living together, 10.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.1% were non-families. 26.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 3.07.

In the borough the population was spread out with 21.8% under the age of 18, 6.5% from 18 to 24, 33.5% from 25 to 44, 22.7% from 45 to 64, and 15.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 91.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.7 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $55,340, and the median income for a family was $65,451. Males had a median income of $46,270 versus $33,277 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $26,551. About 2.6% of families and 3.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.0% of those under age 18 and 5.4% of those age 65 or over.

Government



Local government

The Borough of Hawthorne is governed under the Faulkner Act, formally known as the Optional Municipal Charter Law, within the Mayor-Council system of municipal government by a Mayor and a seven-member Borough Council.

A Charter Study Commission, formed in the 1980s after two major commercial businesses left the borough, led to a recommendation for the adoption of a Mayor-Council form in which there are four wards to give residents a representative in each area of the community, in addition to a mayor and two at-large members of the borough council, all of whom are directly elected by residents. After residents approved the commission's recommendations, the first election under the Mayor-Council form was held in 1989. The four ward seats are up for vote together and the three at-large seats and the mayoral position up for vote two years later. All elections are held on a partisan basis as part of the November general election.

As of 2015, the Mayor of the Borough of Hawthorne is Republican Richard S. Goldberg, whose term of office ends December 31, 2017. Members of the Hawthorne Borough Council are Council President John Bertollo (Ward 2, 2015), Council Vice President Frank E. Matthews (Ward 4, 2015), Bruce Bennett (R, at large, 2017), John Lane (R, at large, 2017), Dominic Mele (R, at large, 2017), Gary Sinning (Ward 3, 2015) and Joseph Wojtecki (Ward 1, 2015).

On July 29, 2008, former Mayor Patrick Botbyl announced he would resign effective August 15, 2008. A special election was held on November 4, 2008, in which Richard Goldberg defeated Joseph Wojtecki to become the mayor of Hawthorne for the remainder of Botbyl's term.

Federal, state and county representation

Hawthorne is located in the 9th Congressional District and is part of New Jersey's 38th state legislative district. Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Hawthorne had been in the 35th state legislative district.

New Jersey's Ninth Congressional District is represented by Bill Pascrell (D, Paterson). New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021) and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).

The 38th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Robert M. Gordon (D, Fair Lawn) and in the General Assembly by Tim Eustace (D, Maywood) and Joseph Lagana (D, Paramus). The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township). The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).

Passaic County is governed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who are elected at-large to staggered three-year terms office on a partisan basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle. At a reorganization meeting held in January, the board selects a Director and Deputy Director from among its members to serve for a one-year term. As of 2015, Passaic County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Hector C. Lora (D, term ends December 31, 2015; Passaic), Freeholder Deputy Director Bruce James (D, 2017; Clifton), John W. Bartlett (D, 2015; Wayne), Theodore O. Best, Jr. (D, 2017; Paterson), Ronda Cotroneo (D, 2015; Ringwood), Terry Duffy (D, 2016; West Milford), and Pat Lepore (D, 2016; Woodland Park). Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Kristin M. Corrado (R, 2019), Sheriff Richard H. Berdnik (2016) and Surrogate Bernice Toledo (2016).

Politics

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 12,060 registered voters in Hawthorne, of which 2,938 (24.4% vs. 31.0% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 3,934 (32.6% vs. 18.7%) were registered as Republicans and 5,181 (43.0% vs. 50.3%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 7 voters registered to other parties. Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 64.2% (vs. 53.2% in Passaic County) were registered to vote, including 81.7% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 70.8% countywide).

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 49.9% of the vote (4,195 cast), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 48.9% (4,114 votes), and other candidates with 1.2% (101 votes), among the 8,480 ballots cast by the borough's 12,679 registered voters (70 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 66.9%. In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 4,618 votes (50.6% vs. 37.7% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 4,256 votes (46.6% vs. 58.8%) and other candidates with 78 votes (0.9% vs. 0.8%), among the 9,132 ballots cast by the borough's 12,101 registered voters, for a turnout of 75.5% (vs. 70.4% in Passaic County). In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 4,614 votes (52.7% vs. 42.7% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 3,863 votes (44.1% vs. 53.9%) and other candidates with 52 votes (0.6% vs. 0.7%), among the 8,753 ballots cast by the borough's 11,624 registered voters, for a turnout of 75.3% (vs. 69.3% in the whole county).

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 62.0% of the vote (3,385 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 36.9% (2,015 votes), and other candidates with 1.2% (63 votes), among the 5,586 ballots cast by the borough's 12,874 registered voters (123 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 43.4%. In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 3,139 votes (53.7% vs. 43.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 2,324 votes (39.8% vs. 50.8%), Independent Chris Daggett with 265 votes (4.5% vs. 3.8%) and other candidates with 36 votes (0.6% vs. 0.9%), among the 5,844 ballots cast by the borough's 11,836 registered voters, yielding a 49.4% turnout (vs. 42.7% in the county).

Education



The Hawthorne Public Schools serve public school students in Kindergarten through twelfth grade. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's five schools had an enrollment of 2,168 students and 173.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a studentâ€"teacher ratio of 12.53:1. Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics) are three K-5 elementary schools â€" Jefferson Elementary School (266 students), Roosevelt Elementary School (541) and Washington Elementary School (286) â€" Lincoln Middle School (567) serves students from the 6th through 8th grades and Hawthorne High School (663) serves students from grades 9 through 12.

In addition to public schools, the K-8 Catholic school, St. Anthony's, operates under the supervision of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Paterson. Hawthorne Christian Academy is an evangelical Christian school established in 1981 by the Hawthorne Gospel Church, serving students in preschool through 12th grade.

Transportation



As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 61.77 miles (99.41 km) of roadways, of which 47.63 miles (76.65 km) were maintained by the municipality, 12.45 miles (20.04 km) by Passaic County and 1.69 miles (2.72 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Public transportation

New Jersey Transit provides train service at the Hawthorne station providing service on the Main Line to Secaucus Junction and Hoboken Terminal.

New Jersey Transit provides bus service on the 148 route to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan, with local service on the 722 route.

Community



Hawthorne is home to the Hawthorne Caballeros Drum and Bugle Corps, which was founded in 1946 and competes as an all-age corps in Drum Corps Associates. The Caballeros are headquartered at Hawthorne's American Legion Post 199.

Bedrin/WalMart Market controversy



A controversy has erupted since the Council voted to allow 24/7 hours of operation in order to accommodate the development of a WalMart Market at 204 Wagaraw Road. Although the planning board approved a supermarket with 42,000 square feet (3,900 m2) of floor space, the identity of the occupant, WalMart Inc., and the hours of operation, 24/7, were not made clear in the public notification. Beginning in January 2012, a group of concerned citizens began asking questions of the developer, County Planning Board, Hawthorne Planning Board and the Hawthorne Borough Council. Residents have raised concerns about the possibility for increased crime that a 24/7 operation could bring given a parking lot large enough for 250+ automobiles and the recent drug epidemic at the 24/7 7-Eleven in Hawthorne. Other concerns include increased traffic to an already congested area, decease in public safety, decrease in property values, increased noise and air pollution, and an overall negative stigma resulting from the poor reputation of WalMart Inc. being associated with Hawthorne.

The Mayor, Richard Goldberg, confirmed that the developer was set to bring in a WalMart Market that would be open 24/7. Dozens of concerned citizens have since voiced opposition at Council meetings. Over 800 residents have signed a petition asking the Council to pass a resolution asking WalMart to pass on the chance to open their first New Jersey WalMart Market in Hawthorne. Hundreds of concerned citizens continue to communicate concerns on the Facebook page "Hawthorne Deserves Better Than WalMart", and hundreds of residents are displaying lawn signs that read "Say No to WalMart and 24/7".

Notable people



People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Hawthorne include:

  • Fulvio Cecere (born 1960), actor.
  • Maurice Carthon (born 1961), former running back for the New York Giants.
  • Lois A. Cuccinello, former member of the Passaic County Board of Chosen Freeholders who became the first woman to serve as Freeholder Director in four decades.
  • Beth Fowler (born 1940), actress.
  • Maria Mazziotti Gillan (born 1940), poet, professor and editor; winner of an American Book Award (2008).
  • John Girgenti (born 1947), New Jersey State Senator from the 35th Legislative District.
  • Debbie Harry (born 1945), rock and roll musician who originally gained fame as the frontwoman for the new wave band Blondie.
  • William Cahoone Johnson, Jr., died helping passengers on to lifeboats on the RMS Titanic
  • Dale Memmelaar (born 1937), offensive lineman in the NFL from 1959 through 1967.
  • Ivan Sergei (born 1972), television actor.

References



External links



  • Hawthorne Borough website
  • Hawthorne Public Schools
  • Hawthorne Public Schools's 2012â€"13 School Report Card from the New Jersey Department of Education
  • School Data for the Hawthorne Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics
  • Hawthorne High School Alumni Forum
  • Hawthorne NYS&W train station restoration and preservation


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