Clifton, New Jersey





Clifton is a city in Passaic County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the city had a total population of 84,136, retaining its position as the state's 11th-largest municipality, as the population increased by 5,464 (+6.9%) from the 78,672 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 6,930 (+9.7%) from the 71,742 counted in the 1990 Census.

Clifton was incorporated as a city by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 26, 1917, replacing Acquackanonk Township, based on the results of a referendum held two days earlier. Clifton is listed under five different ZIP Codes (07011 Main Avenue, 07012 Allwood, 07013, 07014 Delawanna and 07015).

Geography


Clifton, New Jersey

Clifton is located at 40°51′44″N 74°09′37″W (40.862137,-74.160393). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city had a total area of 11.397 square miles (29.518 km2), of which, 11.260 square miles (29.164 km2) of it was land and 0.137 square miles (0.355 km2) of it (1.20%) was water.

Clifton is located 10 miles (16 km) west of New York City off both Route 3 and Route 46. The city is also served by the Garden State Parkway, Route 19 and Route 21.

Demographics



Census 2010

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 84,136 people, 30,661 households, and 21,125 families residing in the city. The population density was 7,472.0 per square mile (2,885.0/km2). There were 31,946 housing units at an average density of 2,837.1 per square mile (1,095.4/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 69.63% (58,588) White, 4.92% (4,137) Black or African American, 0.50% (419) Native American, 8.90% (7,488) Asian, 0.03% (22) Pacific Islander, 12.44% (10,464) from other races, and 3.59% (3,018) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 31.92% (26,854) of the population.

There were 30,661 households, of which 30.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.3% were married couples living together, 13.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.1% were non-families. 26.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.74 and the average family size was 3.33.

In the city, 22.0% of the population were under the age of 18, 8.8% from 18 to 24, 28.3% from 25 to 44, 27.0% from 45 to 64, and 13.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38.4 years. For every 100 females there were 93.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.4 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $62,271 (with a margin of error of +/- $3,208) and the median family income was $76,070 (+/- $2,883). Males had a median income of $49,780 (+/- $2,391) versus $40,149 (+/- $2,057) for females. The per capita income for the city was $29,812 (+/- $1,255). About 7.2% of families and 9.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.5% of those under age 18 and 9.3% of those age 65 or over.

Same-sex couples headed 243 households in 2010.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 78,672 people, 30,244 households, and 20,354 families residing in the city. The population density was 6,965.2 people per square mile (2,688.1/km2). There were 31,060 housing units at an average density of 2,749.9 per square mile (1,061.3/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 66.22% White, 2.89% African American, 0.24% Native American, 6.44% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 9.60% from other races, and 4.57% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 19.84% of the population.

There were 30,244 households out of which 28.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.3% were married couples living together, 11.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.7% were non-families. 27.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.59 and the average family size was 3.20.

In the city the population was 21.6% under the age of 18, 7.7% from 18 to 24, 30.7% from 25 to 44, 22.5% from 45 to 64, and 17.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 91.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.1 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $50,619, and the median income for a family was $60,688. Males had a median income of $40,143 versus $32,090 for females. The per capita income for the city was $23,638. About 4.3% of families and 6.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.6% of those under age 18 and 5.2% of those age 65 or over.

The largest ancestry groups in Clifton as of 2000 were Italian American (17%), Polish American (13%), Irish American (9%) and German American (8%). Many Turkish, Albanian, and Ukrainian immigrants also live in Clifton. There are significant populations of Puerto Ricans, Dominicans, Arabs, Filipinos, Chinese, and Indians as well.

Government


Clifton, New Jersey

Local government

The city of Clifton is governed under the 1923 Municipal Manager Law. The government consists of a City Council comprising seven council members, with all positions elected at large in nonpartisan elections to four-terms of office on a concurrent basis. The mayor is chosen by the City Council, with the position usually given to the top vote getter in the previous election. Clifton's municipal elections are held in even numbered years, and had been held in May as required for municipalities conducting nonpartisan elections. Following the passage of a state law in 2010 allowing nonpartisan elections to be shifted to November, Clifton voters were overwhelmingly in favor of the move in a non-binding referendum held in November 2013. On December 13, 2013, the Clifton City Council voted 6-0, with one abstention, to make the move to a November election binding, which had the effect of extending the terms of all sitting council members by six months, from June 30 to December 31. Officials cited increased voter participation and reduced costs as the justifications behind supporting the shift.

As of 2015, Clifton's mayor is Republican James Anzaldi, whose term of office ends December 31, 2018. Anzaldi had been a member of the City Council since 1978 and was first selected to be Mayor in 1990, succeeding two-term Mayor Gloria Kolodziej. Anzaldi is the first mayor in Clifton's history to be elected to six terms. Members of the City Council are James Anzaldi, Peter C. Eagler, William "Bill" Gibson, Matthew Grabowski, Steven Hatala, Jr., Joseph C. Kolodziej and Lauren E. Murphy, all of whom are serving concurrent terms of office that end on December 31, 2018.

If a vacancy occurs at any time in the term, a special election is held in November of the year the seat became vacant unless it is a council election year. Since 1990, Clifton has called special elections to fill council seats three times. In 1992, councilman George Bayeux died and Richard Stockinger was elected to replace him. The next special election came in 1996 when Stockinger himself died of lung cancer, with Edward M. Welsh elected to fill his seat. In 2006, just before the new council was to be sworn in, Antonio Latona was disqualified from taking his seat due to a conflict of interest involving his work for the Clifton Fire Department and eighth-place vote getter Matt Ward was temporarily appointed to the council in Latona's place. Ward ran for his seat in the subsequent special election called for November 2007 and won the balance of the term.

Federal, state and county representation

Clifton is located in the 9th Congressional District and is part of New Jersey's 34th state legislative district. Prior to the 2010 Census, Clifton had been part of the 8th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.

New Jersey's Ninth Congressional District is represented by Bill Pascrell (D, Paterson). New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021) and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).

The 34th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Nia Gill (D, Montclair) and in the General Assembly by Thomas P. Giblin (D, Montclair) and Sheila Y. Oliver (D, East Orange). The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township). The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).

Passaic County is governed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who are elected at-large to staggered three-year terms office on a partisan basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle. At a reorganization meeting held in January, the board selects a Director and Deputy Director from among its members to serve for a one-year term. As of 2015, Passaic County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Hector C. Lora (D, term ends December 31, 2015; Passaic), Freeholder Deputy Director Bruce James (D, 2017; Clifton), John W. Bartlett (D, 2015; Wayne), Theodore O. Best, Jr. (D, 2017; Paterson), Ronda Cotroneo (D, 2015; Ringwood), Terry Duffy (D, 2016; West Milford), and Pat Lepore (D, 2016; Woodland Park). Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Kristin M. Corrado (R, 2019), Sheriff Richard H. Berdnik (2016) and Surrogate Bernice Toledo (2016).

Politics

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 44,550 registered voters in Clifton, of which 14,138 (31.7% vs. 31.0% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 7,542 (16.9% vs. 18.7%) were registered as Republicans and 22,851 (51.3% vs. 50.3%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 19 voters registered to other parties. Among the city's 2010 Census population, 52.9% (vs. 53.2% in Passaic County) were registered to vote, including 67.9% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 70.8% countywide).

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 62.6% of the vote (18,761 cast), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 36.3% (10,885 votes), and other candidates with 1.0% (305 votes), among the 30,261 ballots cast by the city's 47,933 registered voters (310 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 63.1%. In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 18,260 votes (56.5% vs. 58.8% countywide), ahead of Republican John McCain with 12,848 votes (39.8% vs. 37.7%) and other candidates with 334 votes (1.0% vs. 0.8%), among the 32,317 ballots cast by the city's 44,903 registered voters, for a turnout of 72.0% (vs. 70.4% in Passaic County). In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 15,597 votes (52.0% vs. 53.9% countywide), ahead of Republican George W. Bush with 13,120 votes (43.8% vs. 42.7%) and other candidates with 228 votes (0.8% vs. 0.7%), among the 29,971 ballots cast by the city's 41,220 registered voters, for a turnout of 72.7% (vs. 69.3% in the whole county).

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 56.0% of the vote (9,304 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 42.8% (7,106 votes), and other candidates with 1.2% (199 votes), among the 16,970 ballots cast by the city's 49,231 registered voters (361 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 34.5%. In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 9,080 ballots cast (49.1% vs. 50.8% countywide), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 8,221 votes (44.5% vs. 43.2%), Independent Chris Daggett with 786 votes (4.3% vs. 3.8%) and other candidates with 243 votes (1.3% vs. 0.9%), among the 18,483 ballots cast by the city's 43,808 registered voters, yielding a 42.2% turnout (vs. 42.7% in the county).

Emergency services



Fire

The Clifton Fire Department, provides fire protection and emergency medical services to Clifton.

Education



The Clifton Public Schools serve students in Kindergarten through twelfth grade. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's 17 schools had an enrollment of 10,992 students and 790.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a studentâ€"teacher ratio of 13.91:1. Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics) are 14 elementary schools serving grades K-5 â€" School One (304 students), School Two (434), School Three (295), School Four (161), School Five (370), School Eight (219), School Nine (333), School Eleven (454), School 12 / Annex (602), School Thirteen (464), School Fourteen (331), School Fifteen (344), School Sixteen (195) and School Seventeen (553) â€" Christopher Columbus Middle School (1,209 students; grades 6-8), Woodrow Wilson Middle School (1,360; 6-8) and Clifton High School / Annex (3,364; 9-12).

With more than 3,300 students enrolled, Clifton High School is the largest single-facility high school in New Jersey; Elizabeth High School had more students, but they were spread over multiple campuses before the school was split into separate academies. An additional overflow site, the Clifton High School Annex, was constructed at a cost of $17 million and opened in September 2009 to accommodate 540 of the school year's 850 incoming Freshman to alleviate overcrowding.

Classical Academy Charter School of Clifton, a charter school for Clifton residents that provides an education based on the classics to students in sixth through eighth grades, was recognized in 2008 by the National Blue Ribbon Schools Program.

Transportation



As of May 2010, the city had a total of 199.94 miles (321.77 km) of roadways, of which 145.43 miles (234.05 km) were maintained by the municipality, 35.95 miles (57.86 km) by Passaic County, 14.06 miles (22.63 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 4.50 miles (7.24 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.

Major roadways in the city include Route 3 (which crosses from east to west along the southern portion of the city), Route 21 (along the Passaic River), Route 19 in the city's northwest and U.S. Route 46. The Garden State Parkway crosses the city, connecting Bloomfield in Essex County to the south to Elmwood Park in Bergen County in the north. Parkway interchanges 153 (signed for Route 3 and Route 46 West) / 153A (for Route 3 East) / 153B (for Route 3 and Route 46 West), 154 (for Route 46), 155 (for Clifton) / 155P (for Clifton / Paterson) and 156 (to Route 46).

Public transportation

New Jersey Transit trains at the Clifton station and Delawanna station follow the New Jersey Transit Main Line to Suffern and Hoboken Terminal. Until 1966, the Newark Branch of the Erie-Lackawanna Railroad served several stations in the town, Athenia (Colfax Avenue) and Allwood.

New Jersey Transit provides bus service on the 190, 191, 192 and 195 routes to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan, to Newark on the 13, 27 and 72 routes, and local service on the 74, 702, 703, 705, 707, 709, 744 routes. DeCamp Bus Lines provides service on the 33 and 66 routes to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan.

In popular culture



  • The character of Rupert Pupkin in Martin Scorsese's film The King of Comedy comes from Clifton.
  • The movie Donnie Brasco, which starred Johnny Depp and Al Pacino, was filmed partially in Clifton in 1996.
  • Many scenes from The Sopranos were filmed in town, including the parking lot of the Valley Regency on Valley Road, Main Memorial Park, and Clifton High School. The golf scenes were filmed at the Upper Montclair Country Club.
  • New York Yankee Hall of Famers Yogi Berra and Phil Rizzuto owned a bowling alley in Clifton called "Rizzuto-Berra Bowling Lanes." The alley, later known as Astro Bowl, was located in the Styertowne Shopping Center in the Allwood section of town and remained open until 1999.
  • The Upper Montclair Country Club was home to the NFL Golf Classic. The Sybase Classic golf tournament was held there annually until 2009.
  • Baseball Hall of Famer Honus Wagner played his last two seasons (1896â€"1897) of minor league baseball for the Paterson Silk Sox. While the team was named Paterson, the team played their games at Doherty Field, located off of Main Avenue behind the Doherty Silk Mill.
  • Clifton has an old sewerage system, accessible to intrepid urban explorers and evidently not actively maintained by any municipal authority or utility, known to some as the "Gates Of Hell." The walls are full of graffiti. The Clifton "Gates of Hell" are featured in Weird New Jersey.

Commerce



  • Rutt's Hut, a hot dog restaurant, is located at the east end of Delawana Avenue. Established in 1928, it was described by Peter Applebome of The New York Times as being "on the long shortlist of the state's esteemed hot dog palaces".
  • Clifton Commons, a shopping center located near Route 3, features numerous stores, restaurants and a 16-screen AMC movie theater, with a gross leasable area of 448,848 square feet (41,699.3 m2).
  • Promenade Shops at Clifton is an upscale mall located on Route 3 West.
  • The now defunct Linens 'n Things, bedding and home furnishings retailer, was headquartered in Clifton before its 2009 bankruptcy.
  • Many low-rise office buildings, containing professional tenants such as law and accounting firms and medical practices, are found on the stretch of Clifton Avenue between City Hall (at Van Houten) and Allwood Road.

Notable people



People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Clifton include:

  • Jay Alford (born 1983), defensive lineman and long snapper for the Super Bowl XLII champion New York Giants.
  • Nina Arianda (born c. 1984), film and theatrical actress.
  • Jonathan Borrajo (born 1987), soccer wingback / defensive midfielder who played for the New York Red Bulls and the Norwegian team Mjøndalen IF.
  • Rubin Carter (1937-2014), professional boxer, author, motivational speaker and activist who was the subject of the Bob Dylan song "Hurricane".
  • David Chase (born 1945), creator of The Sopranos.
  • Bartolo Colon (born 1973), pitcher for the New York Mets.
  • Dow H. Drukker (1872â€"1963), represented New Jersey's 6th congressional district from 1914-1919.
  • Vera Farmiga (born 1973), actress and director.
  • Hector Fonseca (born 1980), deejay and music producer.
  • Father Mychal F. Judge (1933â€"2001), FDNY Chaplain, who was the first official death of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center.
  • Chris Karcz (born 1983), professional soccer player with the New York Red Bulls.
  • Ernest Mario (born 1938), pharmaceutical executive.
  • Ronald F. Maxwell (born 1949), movie director.
  • Matt Miazga (born 1995), defender for the New York Red Bulls in Major League Soccer.
  • Chris Opperman (born 1978), modern composer who performed on Steve Vai's Grammy-nominated composition "Lotus Feet" grew up in Clifton and attended CHS.
  • Morris Pashman (1912â€"1999), New Jersey Supreme Court Justice.
  • Angelo Paternoster (1919-2012), offensive tackle for the Washington Redskins who went on to practice dentistry in Clifton.
  • Norman M. Robertson, local Republican Party politician who served on the Passaic County Board of Chosen Freeholders and later in the New Jersey State Senate from 1997 until 2001.
  • Giuseppe Rossi (born 1987), Italian American soccer player.
  • Jon Seda (born 1970), actor best known for his roles in NBC's Homicide: Life on the Street and the movie Selena.
  • Steve Smith (born 1985), wide receiver for the Philadelphia Eagles.
  • Jimmy Snuka (born 1943), semi-retired professional wrestler.
  • William Staub (1915-2012), inventor of the home treadmill.
  • Dave Szott (born 1967), former NFL offensive lineman who played for the New York Jets.
  • Lawrence Tynes (born 1978), kicker for the New York Giants.
  • Dave White (born 1979), Derringer Award-winning mystery author and educator.
  • Ivan Wilzig (born 1956), Techno musician.
  • Gerald H. Zecker (born 1942), member of the New Jersey General Assembly who also served as mayor of Clifton.

References



External links



  • City of Clifton website
  • Clifton Public Schools
  • Clifton Public Schools's 2012â€"13 School Report Card from the New Jersey Department of Education
  • School Data for the Clifton Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics
  • Clifton National Little League Website


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