Brick Township, New Jersey





Brick Township (also commonly known as Bricktown or Brick) is a township in Ocean County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township had a population of 75,072, making it the state's 13th-largest municipality and the third most populous municipality in Ocean County (behind Lakewood Township and Toms River Township), having seen a decline of 1,047 residents (-1.4%) from its population of 76,119 in the 2000 Census, when it was the state's 12th most-populous municipality.

While the majority of Brick Township is located on the mainland, Ocean Beaches I, II and III are situated on the Barnegat Peninsula, a long, narrow barrier peninsula that separates Barnegat Bay from the Atlantic Ocean. The mainland and beach area of the town are not geographically adjacent. Brick Township was incorporated as a township by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 15, 1850, from portions of both Dover Township (now Toms River Township) and Howell Township. The township was named after Joseph Brick, the owner of Bergen Iron Works located on the Metedeconk River. Portions of the township were taken to form Point Pleasant Beach (May 18, 1886), Bay Head (June 15, 1886), Lakewood Township (March 23, 1892), Mantoloking (April 10, 1911) and Point Pleasant (April 21, 1920). In 1963, voters rejected a referendum that would have changed the township's name to "Laurelton".

The Havens Homestead Museum is dedicated to the Havens family that originally settled in the Laurelton/Burrsville section of Brick. The museum is the original Havens home which lies on a small plot of farmland. The museum has a gift shop and runs tours of the property daily.

After hovering for years in the top five, in 2006, the township earned the title of "America's Safest City", out of 371 cities included nationwide in the 13th annual Morgan Quitno survey. Since the year 2000, Brick Township has been the safest "city" (population over 75,000) in New Jersey. In 2003 and 2004, Brick Township was ranked as the second safest city in the United States after Newton, Massachusetts. In 2005, Brick Township had dropped down to the fifth safest "city" (population over 75,000) in the United States, before it rebounded to the top in 2006. In 2009, Brick Township ranked No. 6 on Newsmax magazine's list of the "Top 25 Most Uniquely American Cities and Towns," a piece written by current CBS News travel editor Peter Greenberg. In determining his ranking, Greenberg cited Brick's consistent nod as a safe city and that its "commercial development of big-box stores, department stores, and chain restaurants has made it a shopping destination for much of northern Ocean County.

Brick Township has also been in the news for a claimed autism epidemic, in which 40 children out of over 6,000 surveyed were found to be autistic, though Brick's autism rate is statistically not far removed from national average. Many of the children found to be autistic were born in Northern New Jersey and other parts of the country. There is no evidence that the levels of autism are linked to any specific environmental factor in Brick. Parents of children diagnosed with autism have moved to the township in order to make use of the special education programs offered by the school district.

Brick has also been home to the Heroin epidemic. According to the state's statistics, in 2012 Brick was ranked sixth in the state by heroin abuse after Newark, Jersey City, Paterson, Atlantic City, and Camden. Brick had 550 reported incidents of heroin or opiate abuse.

During the December 2010 North American blizzard, Brick Township received 30 inches (760 mm) of snow, the highest accumulation recorded in the state. In October 2012, parts of Brick were devastated by Hurricane Sandy. Barrier island and other waterfront properties were particularly hard hit. Homes and such buildings as the Shore Acres Yacht Club sustained major damage; some buildings had to be demolished.

Geography


Brick Township, New Jersey

Brick Township is located at 40°03′42″N 74°06′35″W (40.061736,-74.10962). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 32.315 square miles (83.697 km2), of which, 25.715 square miles (66.602 km2) of it was land and 6.600 square miles (17.095 km2) of it (20.42%) was water.

Near exit 91 of the Garden State Parkway lie the communities of Parkway Pines and Herbertsville, near the Monmouth County border and are geographically distant from the rest of the township. Bayberry Court and Maypink Lane are two streets that are not accessible from any other Brick roads, and are served by the United States Postal Service as ZIP code 07731 with Howell Township.

Demographics



2010 Census

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 75,072 people, 29,842 households, and 20,173 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,919.4 per square mile (1,127.2/km2). There were 33,677 housing units at an average density of 1,309.6 per square mile (505.6/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 93.05% (69,856) White, 2.00% (1,502) Black or African American, 0.14% (104) Native American, 1.56% (1,173) Asian, 0.04% (27) Pacific Islander, 1.80% (1,350) from other races, and 1.41% (1,060) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 7.06% (5,301) of the population.

There were 29,842 households, of which 27.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.6% were married couples living together, 10.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.4% were non-families. 27.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 13.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 3.05.

In the township, 20.7% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.6% from 18 to 24, 23.8% from 25 to 44, 29.9% from 45 to 64, and 17.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.6 years. For every 100 females there were 91.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.6 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $65,129 (with a margin of error of +/- $2,969) and the median family income was $81,868 (+/- $2,081). Males had a median income of $60,769 (+/- $1,755) versus $41,361 (+/- $1,655) for females. The per capita income for the township was $33,258 (+/- $891). About 4.1% of families and 5.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.1% of those under age 18 and 5.9% of those age 65 or over.

2000 Census

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 76,119 people, 29,511 households, and 20,775 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,901.5 people per square mile (1,120.5/km²). There were 32,689 housing units at an average density of 1,246.0 per square mile (481.2/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 95.81% White, 0.99% African American, 0.10% Native American, 1.19% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.85% from other races, and 1.04% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any nationality were 3.85% of the population.

There were 29,511 households out of which 31.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.8% were married couples living together, 10.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.6% were non-families. 25.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.56 and the average family size was 3.07.

In the township the population was spread out with 23.8% under the age of 18, 6.4% from 18 to 24, 29.5% from 25 to 44, 23.3% from 45 to 64, and 17.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 90.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.8 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $52,092, and the median income for a family was $61,446. Males had a median income of $44,981 versus $31,020 for females. The per capita income for the township was $24,462. About 3.1% of families and 4.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.8% of those under age 18 and 5.0% of those age 65 or over.

Government



Local government

The township operates within the Faulkner Act (formally known as the Optional Municipal Charter Law) under the Mayor-Council plan 2 form of government, as implemented on January 1, 1990, based on direct petition. The governing body consists of a mayor and a seven-member Township Committee who are elected to four-year terms of office, with either three or four seats up for election at-large on a staggered basis in odd-numbered years. The mayor is elected for a four-year term without limitation as to the number of terms. In November 1988, the voters approved a referendum which returned the township to the partisan system of government. As a result, township elections are held as part of the November general election (rather than in May).

The mayor is the township's chief executive and administrative officer and is responsible for administering local laws and policy development. The mayor makes various appointments, prepares the township's budget, and approves or vetoes ordinances adopted by the Township Council (which may be overridden by a â…" vote of the Township Council). The mayor appoints, with the advice and consent of the Township Council, the business administrator, the township attorney, and the directors of the Departments of Public Safety, Engineering and Public Works.

As of 2015, the mayor of Brick Township is Democrat John G. Ducey, whose term of office ends on December 31, 2017. Ducey garnered 62% of the vote in the November 2013 general elections, defeating Republican opponent Joseph Sangiovanni. Members of the Township Council (with party affiliation, term-end year and committee chairmanship listed in parentheses) are Council President Susan Lydecker (D, 2015; Land Use / Redevelopment), Vice President Jim Fozman (D, 2015; Business and Finance / Public Works), Heather deJong (D, 2017; Ethics / Economic Development), Bob Moore (D, 2015), Paul Mummolo (D, 2017; Sandy Recovery & Mitigation), Marianna Pontoriero (D, 2017; Public Safety) and Andrea Zapcic (D, 2015 - serving an unexpired term; Recreation).

Former Mayor Joseph C. Scarpelli resigned as of December 8, 2006, amid a federal corruption probe into township government. On January 8, 2007, Scarpelli pleaded guilty to federal bribery charges for accepting money from developers in exchange for using his official position to obtain approval for development projects. Township Clerk Virginia Lampman was appointed to fill the role of mayor until the Township Council could select a replacement. On December 17, 2007, former Scarpelli was sentenced in Federal Court in Newark to serve 18 months in prison and was fined $5,000, after admitting that he had accepted bribes from 1998 to 2003.

On January 4, 2007, Daniel J. Kelly (D), the Township's Planning Board chairman, was appointed the new mayor by a three-member township council subcommittee. On November 6, 2007, Stephen C. Acropolis defeated Kelly in a race to fill the remaining two years of Scarpelli's term.

Federal, state, and county representation

Brick Township is located in the 3rd Congressional District and is part of New Jersey's 10th state legislative district. Prior to the 2010 Census, Brick Township had been part of the 4th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.

New Jersey's 3rd Congressional District is represented by Tom MacArthur (R, Toms River). New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021) and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).

For the 2014-15 Session, the 10th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by James W. Holzapfel (R, Toms River Township) and in the General Assembly by Gregory P. McGuckin (R, Toms River Township) and David W. Wolfe (R, Brick Township). The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township). The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).

Ocean County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members, elected on an at-large basis in partisan elections and serving staggered three-year terms of office, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization held in the beginning of January, the board chooses a Director and a Deputy Director from among its members. As of 2015, Ocean County's Freeholders (with party affiliation, term-end year, residence and department directorship listed in parentheses) are Freeholder Director John C. Bartlett, Jr. (R, term ends December 31, 2015, Pine Beach; Finance, Parks and Recreation), Freeholder Deputy Director Gerry P. Little (R, 2015, Surf City; Human Services), John P. Kelly (R, 2016, Eagleswood Township; Law and Public Safety), James F. Lacey (R, 2016, Brick Township; Transportation) and Joseph H. Vicari (R, 2017, Toms River; Senior Services and County Operations). Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Scott M. Colabella (R, 2015, Barnegat Light), Sheriff Michael Mastronardy (R, 2016; Toms River) and Surrogate Jeffrey Moran (R, 2018, Beachwood).

Politics

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 48,760 registered voters in Brick Township, of which 9,992 (20.5%) were registered as Democrats, 12,206 (25.0%) were registered as Republicans and 26,528 (54.4%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 34 voters registered to other parties. Among the township's 2010 Census population, 65.0% (vs. 63.2% in Ocean County) were registered to vote, including 81.9% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 82.6% countywide).

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 55.9% of the vote (18,484 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 42.9% (14,184 votes), and other candidates with 1.2% (387 votes), among the 33,328 ballots cast by the township's 51,117 registered voters (273 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 65.2%. In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 58.1% of the vote (21,912 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 39.9% (15,031 votes) and other candidates with 1.3% (489 votes), among the 37,704 ballots cast by the township's 50,742 registered voters, for a turnout of 74.3%. In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 60.9% of the vote (21,888 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 37.8% (13,596 votes) and other candidates with 0.8% (363 votes), among the 35,954 ballots cast by the township's 48,235 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 74.5.

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 74.4% of the vote (17,331 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 24.2% (5,633 votes), and other candidates with 1.4% (332 votes), among the 23,830 ballots cast by the township's 50,398 registered voters (534 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 47.3%. In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 67.3% of the vote (17,822 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 25.2% (6,675 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 5.0% (1,336 votes) and other candidates with 1.0% (272 votes), among the 26,479 ballots cast by the township's 49,529 registered voters, yielding a 53.5% turnout.

Education



The Brick Public Schools serve students in prekindergarten through twelfth grade. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's 12 schools had an enrollment of 9,893 students and 729.1 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a studentâ€"teacher ratio of 13.57:1. Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics) are Primary Learning Center (had 672 students in pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten; reconfigured as Warren H. Wolf Elementary School), Drum Point Elementary School (458; K-5), Herbertsville Elementary School (249; K-5), Lanes Mill Elementary School (505; K-5), Midstreams Elementary School (513; K-5), Osborneville Elementary School (299; K-5), Veterans Memorial Elementary School (619; K-5), Warren H. Wolf Elementary School (NA, created for 2014-15 school year from Primary Learning Center) Emma Havens Young Elementary School (865; K-5), Lake Riviera Middle School (1,063; 6-8), Veterans Memorial Middle School (1,243; 6-8), Brick Memorial High School (1,842; 9-12) and Brick Township High School (1,573; 9-12).

Nonsectarian private schools include Cuddle Care Early Childhood Center and Ocean Early Childhood Center. St. Dominic Elementary School is a Roman Catholic private school overseen by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Trenton, and St. Paul's Christian School, a Methodist private school, serve students in nursery through eighth grade.

Transportation



Roads and highways

The major county routes that pass through are CR 528, and CR 549 (as well as its spur). Two state routes pass through: Route 70 and Route 88. The Garden State Parkway passes through the western part of the municipality with three interchanges: Exits 91, 90, and 89 (Exit 91 is only accessible from the south-bound Garden State Parkway).

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 318.77 miles (513.01 km) of roadways, of which 256.23 miles (412.36 km) were maintained by the municipality, 46.64 miles (75.06 km) by Ocean County and 12.61 miles (20.29 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 3.29 miles (5.29 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.

The Laurelton Circle was located near the center of Brick Township. The traffic circle was at the junction of Route 70, Route 88 and Princeton Avenue. It was converted to a traffic light regulated intersection in 1986, due to an increase in traffic and accidents. To reduce the need for left turns, a short portion of eastbound Route 88 was re-routed onto Princeton Avenue. Some other movements are controlled by jughandles and a two-way connection in the northwest corner.

See also
  • List of traffic circles in New Jersey

Public transportation

New Jersey Transit offers bus service between the township and the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan on the 137 route, to Philadelphia on the 317 and to Newark on the 67.

Media



WBGD 91.9FM (Brick Green Dragons) went on the air in 1974 and was originally located at Brick Township High School. The station was later moved to broadcast from Brick Memorial High School. The radio station was the brainchild of a teacher named Robert Beosch who taught Electronics at Brick Township High School in the 60's 70's and 80's. The station was a student run radio station and received its original license from the FCC as an educational broadcast license. The most notable broadcast was the first ever State High School Football Championship game played between Brick Township High School and Camden High School in December 1974. The Brick Green Dragons defeated Camden 21 to 20 on the last play of the game to win the first New Jersey State High School Football Championship Game. In 2007, during routine roof maintenance and repair work, the broadcast tower was cut off the roof, and was never replaced or repaired. WBGD has ceased operations.

Sports



The Brick Pop Warner Little Scholars Mustangs finished the 2006 season with a perfect 9-0 record and won the Jersey Shore B Division.

In 2003, 2006, 2007, 2008 and 2009, the Pop Warner Brick Mustang cheerleaders went to compete against other teams from across the nation in Disney World. In 2003, the junior peewee Mustang cheer squad was the first to win the national title in Brick Township history.

Brick is home of the Ocean Ice Palace, built in 1960, which hosts the Brick Hockey Club. The rink is also home to the Brick Stars, a special needs hockey team who has home games and practices. [1] [2]

Notable people



People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Brick Township include:

  • Robert Auriemma, New Jersey's all time winningest high school ice hockey coach. He was ranked fourth nationally for wins among high school ice hockey coaches, achieving his 600th on January 8, 2008.
  • Harry Bernstein (1910â€"2011), author of The Invisible Wall.
  • Hank Borowy (1916â€"2004), Major League Baseball All-Star pitcher who played for the New York Yankees, Chicago Cubs, Philadelphia Phillies, Pittsburgh Pirates and Detroit Tigers. He lived the majority of his life in Brick Township and died there at age 88.
  • Nick Catone (born 1981), mixed martial artist who participates in the Ultimate Fighting Championships.
  • Jim Dowd, (born 1968), former player in the National Hockey League (NHL), won a Stanley Cup with the 1994-95 New Jersey Devils and last played for the Philadelphia Flyers.
  • Kirsten Dunst (born 1982), actress, grew up in the township before relocating to California.
  • Garrett Graham (born 1986), NFL tight end who plays for the Houston Texans.
  • Jack Martin (1887â€"1980), Major League Baseball infielder who played for the 1912 New York Yankees (Highlanders), 1914 Philadelphia Phillies and Boston Braves, who lived out his twilight years in Brick Township and is the namesake of Jack Martin Boulevard.
  • Tom McCarthy (born 1968), television announcer for the Philadelphia Phillies.
  • Travis Spader, ATV motocross racer, lived in Brick when he won his GNC National Championship in 2000.
  • Art Thoms, (born 1947), NFL defensive tackle for the Oakland Raiders (1969â€"1975) and Philadelphia Eagles (1977).
  • Warren Wolf, long-time football coach for Brick Township High School who served on the Brick council as freeholder and in the state assembly.

References



External links



  • Brick Township website
  • Brick Public Schools
  • Brick Stars Official Website
  • Brick Public Schools's 2012â€"13 School Report Card from the New Jersey Department of Education
  • School Data for the Brick Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics
  • Brick Branch of Ocean County Library
  • Bricktown Online - Community Information Portal
  • Brick Township Historical Society


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