Sussex, New Jersey





Sussex is a borough in Sussex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 2,130, reflecting a decline of 15 (-0.7%) from the 2,145 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 56 (-2.5%) from the 2,201 counted in the 1990 Census.

Sussex was incorporated as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on October 14, 1891, as Deckertown, from portions of Wantage. The borough was renamed Sussex on March 2, 1902.

A joint commission of residents of both Sussex and Wantage had recommended that the two communities should be consolidated to form what would be called the Township of Sussex-Wantage, which would operate within the Faulkner Act under the Council-Manager form of government, with a mayor and a six-member township council, and that voters in both municipalities should approve a referendum to be held on November 3, 2009. The committee noted that the two municipalities share common issues, schools, library and community services and that the artificial nature of the octagonal Sussex border often made it hard to distinguish between the two. The efforts at consolidation with surrounding Wantage Township ended in November 2009 after Wantage voters rejected the merger despite support from Sussex borough residents.

Geography


Sussex, New Jersey

Sussex borough is located at 41°12′35″N 74°36′24″W (41.209859, âˆ'74.606535). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 0.619 square miles (1.604 km2), of which, 0.589 square miles (1.526 km2) of it was land and 0.030 square miles (0.078 km2) of it (4.86%) was water. It is approximately 400 to 450 feet (120 to 140 m) above sea level.

The borough is in the watershed of the Wallkill River (which flows north, and empties into the Rondout Creek, which flows into the Hudson River near Kingston, New York) and its tributary Glen Brook, which near Sussex forms a small body of water called Clove Lake, part of which is within the borough.

Climate


Sussex, New Jersey

Due to its inland location and elevation, Sussex has a climate much cooler than most of the state, classified as humid continental (Köppen Dfb), with cold, moderately snowy winters, and very warm, humid summers. It is part of USDA Plant Hardiness Zone 6. The monthly daily average temperature ranges from 25.0 °F (âˆ'3.9 °C) in January to 71.1 °F (21.7 °C) in July. Temperatures reach 90 °F (32 °C) on 12.6 days and fall to 0 °F (âˆ'18 °C) on 6 nights annually. Snowfall averages 42 inches (107 cm) per season, although this usually varies widely from year to year. Extremes in temperature range from âˆ'29 °F (âˆ'34 °C) on January 21, 1994 up to 106 °F (41 °C) on January 10, 1936.

Demographics


Sussex, New Jersey

2010 Census

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 2,130 people, 899 households, and 525 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,615.9 per square mile (1,396.1/km2). There were 1,005 housing units at an average density of 1,706.1 per square mile (658.7/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 91.03% (1,939) White, 1.92% (41) Black or African American, 0.33% (7) Native American, 2.30% (49) Asian, 0.42% (9) Pacific Islander, 1.36% (29) from other races, and 2.63% (56) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 7.93% (169) of the population.

There were 899 households, of which 26.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 36.8% were married couples living together, 15.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 41.6% were non-families. 36.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.32 and the average family size was 3.04.

In the borough, 22.8% of the population were under the age of 18, 9.6% from 18 to 24, 27.3% from 25 to 44, 28.1% from 45 to 64, and 12.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38.7 years. For every 100 females there were 100.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.2 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $40,978 (with a margin of error of +/- $13,975) and the median family income was $53,125 (+/- $10,034). Males had a median income of $40,234 (+/- $9,777) versus $30,777 (+/- $3,942) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $20,887 (+/- $2,314). About 13.0% of families and 15.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.4% of those under age 18 and 12.0% of those age 65 or over.

2000 Census

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 2,145 people, 903 households, and 512 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,598 people per square mile (1,380/km2). There were 961 housing units at an average density of 1,612/sq mi (618/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 96.32% White, 1.12% African American, 0.09% Native American, 1.21% Asian, 0.37% from other races, and 0.89% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.56% of the population.

There were 903 households out of which 28.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.9% were married couples living together, 12.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 43.2% were non-families. 35.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.36 and the average family size was 3.12.

In the borough the population was spread out with 23.9% under the age of 18, 8.5% from 18 to 24, 32.9% from 25 to 44, 22.0% from 45 to 64, and 12.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 91.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.8 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $36,172, and the median income for a family was $45,250. Males had a median income of $37,009 versus $22,475 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $18,866. About 6.9% of families and 11.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.6% of those under age 18 and 8.4% of those age 65 or over.

Government



Local government

Sussex is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle. The Borough form of government used by Sussex, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.

As of 2015, the Mayor of Sussex Borough is Republican Jonathan Michael Rose, whose term of office ends on December 31, 2015. Members of the Borough Council are Council President Linda A. Masson (R, 2015), Robert Holowach (R, 2017), Mario Poggi (R, 2016; serving an unexpired term), Katherine Little (D, 2017), Annette Stendor (R, 2015) and Georgeanna R. Stoll (R, 2016).

In January 2015, the Borough Council selected Mario Poggi from three candidates nominated by the Republican municipal committee to fill the vacant seat of Bruce D. LaBar, who resigned from office earlier that monyh.

Federal, state and county representation

Sussex Borough is located in the 5th Congressional District and is part of New Jersey's 24th state legislative district.

New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District is represented by Scott Garrett (R, Wantage Township). New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021) and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 24th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Steve Oroho (R, Franklin) and in the General Assembly by Alison Littell McHose (R, Franklin) and Parker Space (R, Wantage Township). The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township). The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).

Sussex County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders whose five members are elected at-large in partisan elections on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Freeholder Director and Deputy Director from among its members, with day-to-day supervision of the operation of the county delegated to a County Administrator. As of 2014, Sussex County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Richard Vohden (R, Green Township, 2016), Deputy Director Dennis J. Mudrick (R, Sparta Township, 2015), Phillip R. Crabb (R, Franklin, 2014), George Graham (R, Stanhope, 2016) and Gail Phoebus (R, Andover Township, 2015). Graham was chosen in April 2013 to fill the seat vacated by Parker Space, who had been chosen to fill a vacancy in the New Jersey General Assembly. Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Jeff Parrott (R, 2016), Sheriff Michael F. Strada (R, 2016) and Surrogate Gary R. Chiusano (R, filling the vacancy after the resignation of Nancy Fitzgibbons). The County Administrator is John Eskilson.

Politics

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 1,143 registered voters in Sussex, of which 193 (16.9% vs. 16.5% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 428 (37.4% vs. 39.3%) were registered as Republicans and 521 (45.6% vs. 44.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There was one voter registered to another party. Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 53.7% (vs. 65.8% in Sussex County) were registered to vote, including 69.5% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 86.5% countywide).

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 391 votes (57.8% vs. 59.4% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 270 votes (39.9% vs. 38.2%) and other candidates with 16 votes (2.4% vs. 2.1%), among the 677 ballots cast by the borough's 1,146 registered voters, for a turnout of 59.1% (vs. 68.3% in Sussex County). In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 427 votes (57.1% vs. 59.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 299 votes (40.0% vs. 38.7%) and other candidates with 18 votes (2.4% vs. 1.5%), among the 748 ballots cast by the borough's 1,109 registered voters, for a turnout of 67.4% (vs. 76.9% in Sussex County). In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 456 votes (62.0% vs. 63.9% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 263 votes (35.7% vs. 34.4%) and other candidates with 16 votes (2.2% vs. 1.3%), among the 736 ballots cast by the borough's 1,091 registered voters, for a turnout of 67.5% (vs. 77.7% in the whole county).

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 70.8% of the vote (276 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 25.4% (99 votes), and other candidates with 3.8% (15 votes), among the 397 ballots cast by the borough's 1,148 registered voters (7 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 34.6%. In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 291 votes (56.8% vs. 63.3% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 140 votes (27.3% vs. 25.7%), Independent Chris Daggett with 59 votes (11.5% vs. 9.1%) and other candidates with 16 votes (3.1% vs. 1.3%), among the 512 ballots cast by the borough's 1,109 registered voters, yielding a 46.2% turnout (vs. 52.3% in the county).

Education



Students in public school for Kindergarten through eighth grade attend the Sussex-Wantage Regional School District, together with students from Wantage Township. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's three schools had an enrollment of 1,362 students and 116.8 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a studentâ€"teacher ratio of 11.66:1. The three schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics) are Clifton E. Lawrence School in Wantage (375 students; grades Kindergarten to 2), Wantage Elementary School in Sussex (484; 3 - 5) and Sussex Middle School in Sussex (503; 6 - 8).

For ninth through twelfth grades, public school students attend High Point Regional High School, located in Sussex, together with students from Branchville, Frankford Township, Lafayette Township and Wantage Township. The school had an enrollment of 1,087 as of the 2011-12 school year.

Sussex Christian School is an inter-denominational Christian private day school that was founded in 1958 by members of the Sussex Christian Reformed Church, and which serves students from Northern New Jersey and the surrounding communities in New York and Pennsylvania.

Transportation



Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 9.21 miles (14.82 km) of roadways, of which 6.67 miles (10.73 km) were maintained by the municipality, 0.87 miles (1.40 km) by Sussex County and 1.67 miles (2.69 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Sussex is located at the intersection of Route 23 and Route 284.

Public transportation

Local bus service is provided by the Skylands Connect bus, which provides service to Hamburg, Sparta, and Newton.

Sussex Airport is located 1 mile (1.6 km) southwest of Sussex.

References



External links



  • Sussex Borough official website
  • Sussex County webpage for Sussex Borough
  • Sussex-Wantage Regional School District
  • Sussex-Wantage Regional School District's 2012â€"13 School Report Card from the New Jersey Department of Education
  • School Data for the Sussex-Wantage Regional School District, National Center for Education Statistics
  • High Point Regional High School
  • The Advertiser-News, community newspaper


Share on Google Plus

About Maya Trico

This is a short description in the author block about the author. You edit it by entering text in the "Biographical Info" field in the user admin panel.
    Blogger Comment
    Facebook Comment

0 komentar :

Posting Komentar