Millburn, New Jersey





Millburn is a suburban township in Essex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 20,149, reflecting an increase of 384 (+1.9%) from the 19,765 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 1,135 (+6.1%) from the 18,630 counted in the 1990 Census.

Millburn was created as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 20, 1857, from portions of Springfield Township, when Union County was formed.

The township hosts South Mountain Reservation and The Mall at Short Hills and is also home to the Paper Mill Playhouse, a 70-year-old regional theater. The township adjoins the suburban municipalities of South Orange, Maplewood, Livingston and Summit.

New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Millburn as the 53rd best place to live in New Jersey in its 2008 rankings of the "Best Places To Live" in New Jersey.

Millburn had the highest annual property tax bills in New Jersey in 2009 at $19,097, compared to the statewide average of $7,300 that year, which was the highest in the United States.

Geography


Millburn, New Jersey

Millburn is located at 40°44′30″N 74°19′17″W (40.741612,-74.321282). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 9.876 square miles (25.579 km2), of which, 9.322 square miles (24.145 km2) of it was land and 0.554 square mile (1.434 km2) of it (5.61%) was water.

Millburn also includes the hamlet of Short Hills. Millburn comprises the historic Wyoming district, and South Mountain and Millburn Center areas. Short Hills contains the sections of Knollwood, Glenwood, Brookhaven, Country Club, Merrywood, Deerfield-Crossroads, Mountaintop, White Oak Ridge, and Old Short Hills Estates. Situated approximately 15 miles (24 km) from Manhattan, Millburn Township is bordered by the municipalities of Livingston, Florham Park, Chatham Township, Summit, Springfield Township, Union Township, Maplewood and West Orange.

The West Branch of the Rahway River runs through downtown Millburn.

Demographics



Millburn has one of the largest Jewish communities in Essex County, along with neighboring Livingston and South Orange. Philip Roth's popular novel Goodbye, Columbus about a newly affluent Jewish family in the 1950s, was set in the Short Hills section of Millburn, and a key scene takes place at the Millburn High School track.

The township has attracted professionals moving out of Manhattan, thanks to direct train service to Penn Station.

In a report performed by the United Way of Northern New Jersey based on 2012 data, around 11% of Millburn households were classified as "Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed" households (below a threshold of $50,000 for households below 65, below $35,000 for those over 65), struggling with basic necessities, such as housing, childcare, food, health care, and transportation, compared to 38% statewide and 47% in Essex County.

2010 Census

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 20,149 people, 6,813 households, and 5,553 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,161.3 per square mile (834.5/km2). There were 7,106 housing units at an average density of 762.2 per square mile (294.3/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 80.17% (16,154) White, 1.63% (329) Black or African American, 0.03% (6) Native American, 15.66% (3,155) Asian, 0.02% (5) Pacific Islander, 0.51% (103) from other races, and 1.97% (397) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 3.49% (703) of the population.

There were 6,813 households, of which 48.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 72.2% were married couples living together, 7.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 18.5% were non-families. 15.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.96 and the average family size was 3.32.

In the township, 32.3% of the population were under the age of 18, 4.2% from 18 to 24, 21.1% from 25 to 44, 31.2% from 45 to 64, and 11.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.0 years. For every 100 females there were 95.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.8 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $165,603 (with a margin of error of +/- $9,937) and the median family income was $194,421 (+/- $14,492). Males had a median income of $136,031 (+/- $14,137) versus $81,152 (+/- $9,621) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $84,663 (+/- $5,971). About 1.3% of families and 1.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.9% of those under age 18 and 0.0% of those age 65 or over.

2000 Census

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 19,765 people, 7,015 households, and 5,604 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,106.2 people per square mile (813.6/km2). There were 7,158 housing units at an average density of 762.8 per square mile (294.6/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 88.91% White, 8.40% Asian, 1.10% African American, 0.05% Native American, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.43% from other races, and 1.08% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.04% of the population. The most common reported ancestries in 2000 were 13.5% Italian, 12.2% Irish, 11.7% Russian and 11.5% German.

There were 7,015 households out of which 44.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 71.6% were married couples living together, 6.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.1% were non-families. 17.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.82 and the average family size was 3.19.

In the township the population was spread out with 30.2% under the age of 18, 3.2% from 18 to 24, 28.4% from 25 to 44, 25.1% from 45 to 64, and 13.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 94.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.2 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $130,848, and the median income for a family was $158,888. Males had a median income of $100,000+ versus $51,603 for females. The per capita income for the township was $76,796. About 1.2% of families and 1.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.4% of those under age 18 and 1.0% of those age 65 or over.

Government



Local government

Since its incorporation as a municipality in 1857, Millburn has operated under the Township form of government with a five-member Township Committee. The Township Committee is elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle. At an annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor. A Business Administrator manages the day-to-day functions of the Township.

As of 2015, members of the Township Committee are Mayor Robert J. Tillotson (R term on committee ends December 31, 2017; term as mayor ends 2015), Deputy Mayor W. Theodore Bourke (R, term on committee ends 2016; term as deputy mayor ends 2015), Cheryl H. Burstein (D, 2017), Sandra H. Haimoff (R, 2015) and Ian Mount (R, 2016).

Haimoff became Mayor in 2008 following the expiration of former mayor Daniel Baer's term on December 31, 2007. Daniel Baer's service had marked the first time in the history of the town that a Democrat held the title of Mayor.

Federal, state and county representation

Millburn is located in the 7th Congressional District and is part of New Jersey's 27th state legislative district. Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Millburn had been in the 21st state legislative district. Prior to the 2010 Census, Millburn had been split between the 10th Congressional District and the 11th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.

New Jersey's Seventh Congressional District is represented by Leonard Lance (R, Clinton Township). New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021) and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 27th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Richard Codey (D, Roseland) and in the General Assembly by Mila Jasey (D, South Orange) and John F. McKeon (D, West Orange). The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township). The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).

Essex County is governed by a directly-elected County Executive, with legislative functions performed by the Board of Chosen Freeholders. As of 2014, the County Executive is Joseph N. DiVincenzo, Jr. The county's Board of Chosen Freeholders consists of nine members, four elected on an at-large basis and one from each of five wards, who serve three-year terms of office on a concurrent basis, all of which end December 31, 2014. Essex County's Freeholders are Freeholder President Blonnie R. Watson (at large; Newark), Freeholder Vice President Patricia Sebold (at large; Livingston), Rufus I. Johnson (at large; Newark), Gerald W. Owens (At large; South Orange, filling the vacant seat after the resignation of Donald Payne, Jr.) Rolando Bobadilla (District 1 - Newark's North and East Wards, parts of Central and West Wards; Newark), D. Bilal Beasley (District 2 - Irvington, Maplewood and Newark's South Ward and parts of West Ward; Irvington), Carol Y. Clark (District 3 - East Orange, Newark's West and Central Wards, Orange and South Orange; East Orange) and Leonard M. Luciano (District 4 - Caldwell, Cedar Grove, Essex Fells, Fairfield, Livingston, Millburn, North Caldwell, Roseland, Verona, West Caldwell and West Orange; West Caldwell), and Brendan W. Gill (District 5 - Belleville, Bloomfield, Glen Ridge, Montclair and Nutley; Montclair). Constitutional elected countywide are County Clerk Christopher J. Durkin (West Caldwell, 2015), Sheriff Armando B. Fontoura (2015) and Surrogate Theodore N. Stephens, II (2016).

Politics

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 14,099 registered voters in Millburn, of which 4,512 (32.0%) were registered as Democrats, 3,214 (22.8%) were registered as Republicans and 6,361 (45.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 12 voters registered to other parties.

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 55.3% of the vote (5,142 cast), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 44.0% (4,087 votes), and other candidates with 0.8% (70 votes), among the 11,587 ballots cast by the township's 14,594 registered voters (2,288 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 79.4%. In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 58.6% of the vote (6,097 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 39.8% (4,144 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (72 votes), among the 10,410 ballots cast by the township's 14,034 registered voters, for a turnout of 74.2%. In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 55.1% of the vote (5,682 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush with 43.9% (4,525 votes) and other candidates with 0.6% (83 votes), among the 10,315 ballots cast by the township's 13,548 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 76.1.

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 63.5% of the vote (3,301 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 35.3% (1,833 votes), and other candidates with 1.3% (65 votes), among the 5,320 ballots cast by the township's 14,670 registered voters (121 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 36.3%. In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 47.9% of the vote (3,308 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 44.6% (3,080 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 6.4% (445 votes) and other candidates with 0.4% (27 votes), among the 6,906 ballots cast by the township's 13,913 registered voters, yielding a 49.6% turnout.

Economy



Dun & Bradstreet has its headquarters in the Short Hills section of Millburn.

Community organizations



Down the Block, Inc., a 501(c)3 organization, was formed by residents in 2009 to pay bills on behalf of Millburn Township residents in financial distress.

Education



The Millburn Township Public Schools serve students in pre-Kindergarten through twelfth grade. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's seven schools had an enrollment of 4,854 students and 371.8 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a studentâ€"teacher ratio of 13.06:1. Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics) are five elementary schools â€" Deerfield Elementary School (526 students in grades PreK-5), Glenwood Elementary School (488; K-5), Hartshorn Elementary School (544; K-5), South Mountain Elementary School (330; PreK-5) and Wyoming Elementary School (336; K-5) â€" Millburn Middle School for sixth through eighth grade (1,151) and Millburn High School for grades 9-12 (1,479).

Millburn High School was ranked as Number 148 in Newsweek magazine's listing of "America's Best High Schools" in the August 5, 2005 issue, a ranking based on the number of AP exams taken by the students at the school in the past year divided by the number of graduating seniors. 98.3% of the class of 2010 planned to attend a four-year college or other post-secondary education.

The district's high school was the 5th-ranked public high school in New Jersey out of 339 schools statewide in New Jersey Monthly magazine's September 2014 cover story on the state's "Top Public High Schools", using a new ranking methodology. The school had been ranked 8th in the state of 328 schools in 2012, after being ranked 1st in 2010 out of 322 schools listed. The magazine also ranked Millburn as the top high school in New Jersey in its 2008 rankings.

The influx of younger families into the community has led to significant growth in public school enrollment, with enrollment doubling from 1990 to 2007.

Far Brook School is a private, nonsectarian coeducational day school located in the Short Hills section of Millburn, serving students in nursery through eighth grade, with a total enrollment of 226 students. The Pingry School's Lower School (K-6) campus is located in Short Hills.

St. Rose of Lima Academy is a Catholic school with 260 students in PreK-3 to 8th grade, operating under the auspices of the Archdiocese of Newark, that was established in 1869 and granted academy status in 2008. In September 2013, the St. Rose of Lima Academy was one of 15 schools in New Jersey to be recognized by the United States Department of Education as part of the National Blue Ribbon Schools Program, an award called the "most prestigious honor in the United States' education system" and which Education Secretary Arne Duncan described as honoring schools that "represent examples of educational excellence".

Transportation



Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 100.77 miles (162.17 km) of roadways, of which 81.45 miles (131.08 km) were maintained by the municipality, 15.65 miles (25.19 km) by Essex County and 3.67 miles (5.91 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

A variety of roads serve Millburn. Major county routes include CR 510, CR 527 and CR 577. Route 24 and Route 124 also pass through along the southwestern border with Summit. Interstate 78 passes through the very southern tip of the township in the area of exit 49.

Public transportation

Millburn Township is served by two New Jersey Transit railroad stations along the Morristown Line, providing service to Newark Broad Street Station, Secaucus Junction and New York Penn Station, as well as to Hoboken Terminal. The Millburn station is located at the intersection of Essex Avenue and Lackawanna Place near the Millburn Free Public Library and the Short Hills station is located near The Crescent Street between Hobart Avenue and Chatham Road. The latter station is also the site of the Millburn-Short Hills Historical Society's museum.

New Jersey Transit operates multiple bus lines along Millburn and Essex Avenues, including the 70 route that stops at the Millburn railroad station on a route between Newark and Livingston.

Sesquicentennial



In June 2007, Millburn celebrated its 150th birthday in its downtown, in one of the biggest celebrations in Millburn history.

Points of interest



  • Cora Hartshorn Arboretum and Bird Sanctuary - A site owned by the daughter of Short Hills founder Stewart Hartshorn, the 16 acres (6.5 ha) park with its 3 miles (4.8 km) of trails was donated to the township in 1958.
  • The Mall at Short Hills is an upscale shopping mall anchored by Neiman Marcus, Saks Fifth Avenue, Nordstrom, Bloomingdale's and Macy's, with a gross leasable area of 1,370,000 square feet (127,000 m2).
  • Paper Mill Playhouse is a 1,200-seat regional theater established in 1938, that has been officially designated as the "State Theatre of New Jersey".
  • B'nai Israel synagogue - Designed by architect Percival Goodman, the synagogue features works by Herbert Ferber, Adolph Gottlieb and Robert Motherwell.
  • Old Short Hills Park, Gero Park and Taylor Park.
  • South Mountain Reservation, an Essex County nature reserve covering more than 2,000 acres (810 ha) of land in Millburn, Maplewood and West Orange.

Notable people



People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Millburn include:

  • Prince Lorenzo Borghese (born 1973), star of the 9th season of The Bachelor.
  • Bill Chinnock (1947-2007), singer-songwriter and guitarist who was part of the Asbury Park music scene with Bruce Springsteen in the late 1960s.
  • James C. Fletcher (1919â€"1991), 4th and 7th Administrator of NASA.
  • William R. Forstchen (born 1950), author.
  • Anne Hathaway (born 1982), actress.
  • Herbert G. Hopwood (1898â€"1966), Commander in chief of the United States Pacific Fleet from 1958 to 1960.
  • Elliott Kalan (born 1981), head writer for The Daily Show.
  • Betty Liu, Bloomberg TV anchor.
  • John C. McGinley (born 1959), actor.
  • Robert E. Mulcahy III (born 1932), athletic director at Rutgers University.
  • Maureen Ogden (born 1928), seven-term member of the New Jersey General Assembly who served as Mayor of Millburn from 1979 to 1981.
  • Belva Plain (born 1919), author.
  • Brian Rolston (born 1973), professional hockey player.
  • Peter Rost (born 1959), author, speaker, expert witness and drug industry whistleblower.
  • Annie Russell (1864â€"1936), British-American theatrical actress.
  • Patti Stanger (born 1961), matchmaker.
  • Joel Weingarten, former member of the New Jersey General Assembly.
  • Wang Yung-ching (1917â€"2008), Taiwan's wealthiest entrepreneur.
  • Rachel Zoe (born 1971), fashion stylist.
  • Alan Zweibel (born 1950), television producer and writer.

References



External links



  • Millburn Township website
  • Millburn Township Public Schools
  • Millburn Township Public Schools's 2012â€"13 School Report Card from the New Jersey Department of Education
  • School Data for the Millburn Township Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics
  • Millburn Public Library
  • Millburn-Short Hills 4th of July Committee
  • "If You're Thinking of Living In/Millburn Township, N.J.; A Town Where Both Halves Live Well", The New York Times, July 16, 2000, by Jerry Cheslow


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